Artists and Food Activism

We have identified access to healthy food as one of the greatest urgencies facing Bethel. According to recent studies by the USDA Economic Research Service, 1 in 6 households in Ohio are currently experiencing food insecurity, making Ohio the sixth most food insecure state in the nation. SOIL SERIES is working to confront this crisis by developing and expanding relational networks and and engaging the community in imagining new possibilities for a healthier future – one that includes accessible nutrition for all. 

Learn more about how we conceive of the relationship between art and agriculture on our about page, and take a look at the following examples of projects by artists that address food and food activism.

 

Swale (A public floating food forest)

Founding artist: Mary Mattingly

Swale is a floating food forest built atop a barge that travels to piers in New York City, offering educational programming and welcoming visitors to harvest herbs, fruits and vegetables for free. Swale strives to strengthen stewardship of public waterways and land, while working to shift policies that will increase the presence of edible perennial landscapes.

Websites|  swaleny.org  &  marymattingly.com

Facebook| Swale (@swaleny)

Instagram| @swaleproject

Twitter| @SwaleNY

 

Conflict Kitchen

Founding artist: Jon Rubin

Conflict Kitchen is a restaurant In Pittsburgh, PA that serves cuisine from countries with which the United States is in conflict. Each Conflict Kitchen iteration is augmented by events, performances, publications, and discussions that seek to expand the engagement the public has with the culture, politics, and issues at stake within the focus region. The restaurant rotates identities in relation to current geopolitical events.

Websites| conflictkitchen.org  &  jonrubin.net

Facebook| Conflict Kitchen (@conflict.kitchen.7)

Instagram| @conflictkitchen

Twitter| @conflictkitchen

 

Fallen Fruit

Founding artists: David Burns & Austin Young

Fallen Fruit began by mapping fruit trees growing on or over public property in Los Angeles. The collaboration has expanded to include serialized public projects and site-specific installations and happenings in various cities around the world. By always working with fruit as a material or media, the catalogue of projects and works reimagine public interactions with the margins of urban space, systems of community and narrative real-time experience.

Website|  fallenfruit.org

Facebook| Fallen Fruit (@fallenfruit)

Instagram| @fallen_fruit

Twitter| @fallenfruit